Gardening in Small Spaces

— Written By Taylor Campbell and last updated by
en Español

El inglés es el idioma de control de esta página. En la medida en que haya algún conflicto entre la traducción al inglés y la traducción, el inglés prevalece.

Al hacer clic en el enlace de traducción se activa un servicio de traducción gratuito para convertir la página al español. Al igual que con cualquier traducción por Internet, la conversión no es sensible al contexto y puede que no traduzca el texto en su significado original. NC State Extension no garantiza la exactitud del texto traducido. Por favor, tenga en cuenta que algunas aplicaciones y/o servicios pueden no funcionar como se espera cuando se traducen.

English is the controlling language of this page. To the extent there is any conflict between the English text and the translation, English controls.

Clicking on the translation link activates a free translation service to convert the page to Spanish. As with any Internet translation, the conversion is not context-sensitive and may not translate the text to its original meaning. NC State Extension does not guarantee the accuracy of the translated text. Please note that some applications and/or services may not function as expected when translated.

Collapse ▲

Gardening, in its many forms, is a popular hobby in North Carolina. It promotes healthy habits such as spending time outdoors, being physically active, and raising homegrown fruits and vegetables for your family. If you live in urban areas, have little space, or have limited mobility, you may think gardening won’t work for you. However, raised-bed and container gardening are good solutions for these challenges.

Raised-bed gardens allow you to have control over the planting media. You can create your own soil or soilless mixes, which is great for areas with poor soil quality or poor drainage. You’ll get better root growth with amended soils and typically higher yields. Raised beds are easier for those with mobility issues because they usually require less stooping and bending during weeding and watering tasks.

Vegetables usually do well in areas that receive full sun, but many will thrive and give you a good crop with less than a full day of sun. For example, carrots, lettuce, radish, spinach, onion, winter squash, cucumber, peas, cauliflower, parsley, and Swiss chard will grow in areas with as little as four to six hours of daily sunlight. Make sure you put your raised beds near a good water source as they will dry out quicker than if planted directly into the ground.

Container gardening may be a great solution for those living in apartments and condominiums or those who just want to garden on the patio in North Carolina. You may use just about any container that holds soil and is large enough to support the plant when it’s fully grown. You will need drainage holes in the bottom of any container to avoid overwatering. You don’t want the plant roots standing in water. Think about clay or wood pots, plastic buckets, wheelbarrows, window boxes, and hanging baskets. Try to avoid very small or dark-colored containers as they will hold heat, and the root zone could get dangerously overheated in full sun.

Nearly all leafy vegetables will do well in containers in North Carolina. You may find many dwarf varieties of your favorite vegetables that will thrive in containers. Crops with many fruits per plant, such as tomatoes, are good choices.

container garden